Lawyers
Laura Robinson

About

Laura* is an advocate whose practice encompasses a broad range of civil litigation, including commercial disputes and professional liability and regulation. Laura has appeared before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and the Court of Appeal for Ontario, as well as numerous administrative boards and tribunals. Laura is§ a former varsity athlete, who now channels her love of competition into the civil arena. Whether on the sports field or in the court room, Laura has a reputation for being fair yet relentless in her pursuits. In law school, Laura garnered an interest in international law through participating in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. She went on to complete internships at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees and the International Criminal Court prior to joining the firm. .

Expertise

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Laura Robinson

is a lawyer at Lenczner Slaght.

Laura’s practice encompasses a range of civil litigation, including commercial disputes and professional liability and regulation.

While at law school, Laura participated in the 2013 Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, receiving an oralist award and advancing with the Queen's team to the international rounds in Washington, D.C.  She also received awards for overall academic achievement, as well as course prizes in criminal and constitutional law.

Prior to joining the firm, Laura completed internships at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in Jerusalem, Israel, and at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, the Netherlands. She also held a student position at the Legislative Assembly of Alberta.

  • Canadian Bar Association

  • Ontario Bar Association

  • The Advocates' Society

  • The Role of Good Faith in Avoiding Contempt of Court

    Many counsel have undoubtedly been asked by their clients what remedies are available in the face of an opposing party who opts not to comply with a court order.  In Ontario, a party may bring a motion for a contempt order to enforce an order requiring a party to do an act (or abstain from doing an act) other than the payment of money. While certain litigants may be enticed by the option of seeking incarceration or additional fines from their adversary due to their non-compliance, the recent case of N-Krypt International Corp. v. Zillacomm Canada Inc. et. al. serves as a reminder that counsel should carefully consider whether a contempt proceeding truly advances their client’s best interest.

    Laura Robinson | July 4, 2016

  • Aird & Berlis LLP Student Award for Overall Academic Achievement (2012)

    Queen's University, Faculty of Law

  • Criminal Law Association Award (2014)

    Queen's University, Faculty of Law

  • David Sabbath Prize in Constitutional Law (2012)

    Queen's University, Faculty of Law

  • Dean's Silver Scholar Award (2012)

    Queen's University, Faculty of Law

  • William S. O'Hara Prize in Criminal Law (2012)

    Queen's University, Faculty of Law

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