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Jacqueline Chan listen

About

Jacqueline* has a background in industrial engineering and applies this training to her legal practice, primarily in the area of intellectual property law. She solves§ complex legal problems for her clients by applying a logical and analytical approach, keeping a careful eye on their bottom line and objectives. However, Jacqueline also knows that in law, one plus one doesn’t always equal two. When the numbers are stacked against her, Jacqueline works relentlessly to change the equation by employing her diverse litigation experience and technical background to determine the most effective solution for her clients. .

Expertise

Details

Jacqueline Chan

is a lawyer at Lenczner Slaght.

Jacqueline's practice encompasses a broad range of intellectual property litigation, including technology, pharmaceutical and biologics patents.

Prior to joining Lenczner Slaght, Jacqueline summered and articled at a prominent civil litigation boutique, specializing in insurance and medical negligence matters. She has appeared before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, as well as administrative tribunals.

She is a graduate of the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University, where she competed in the national Harold G. Fox Intellectual Property Moot, and was awarded the Bereskin & Parr LLP Prize for highest-standing in Patent Law and the Queen’s Law Prize in Advanced Torts. While in law school, she also volunteered as a student caseworker at Queen's Legal Aid, providing litigation services to low-income residents in Kingston, Ontario.

Jacqueline holds a Bachelor of Applied Science and a Master of Applied Science in Industrial Engineering from the University of Toronto. Prior to law school, she worked as an analyst at both a major teaching hospital and global technology consulting firm.

  • The Advocates' Society

  • Canadian Bar Association

  • Ontario Bar Association

  • Young Women in Law

  • The Federal Court of Appeal Clarifies the “Obvious to Try” Test

    The Federal Court of Appeal (“FCA”) has clarified the extent of flexibility afforded when undertaking the “Obvious to Try” test in Amgen v Pfizer, 2020 FCA 188. Although it ultimately cautioned against a segmented approach, the FCA did not dismiss the possibility that experimental steps could be assessed individually in order to make conclusions about an experiment as a whole, particularly with respect to the Self-Evident and Extent of Effort factors of the test. Despite agreeing that the Federal Court (“FC”) could have been more expansive and all-embracing in its overall conclusion, the FCA did not deem the FC’s lack of analysis to have amounted to a palpable and overriding error.

    Sana Halwani & Jacqueline Chan | November 16, 2020

  • The Federal Court of Appeal Takes No Prisoners

    On October 15, 2020, both parties were granted leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada. We will continue to follow the developments of the appeal.

    Sana Halwani & Jacqueline Chan | April 27, 2020

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